Art in fifteenth-century Italy.
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Art in fifteenth-century Italy.

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Published by Open University Press in Milton Keynes .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesVenice, Rome and late fifteenth-century Florence.
Statementprepared for the course team by Tim Benton, Catherine King and Di Norman.
SeriesArts : a third level course, A353 -- block 5
ContributionsBenton, Tim., King, Catherine., Norman, Di., Open University. Art in Fifteenth-Century Italy Course Team.
The Physical Object
Pagination76p. :
Number of Pages76
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15001353M
ISBN 100335112897

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  Based on the book’s subtitle, one would expect to learn about banking, metaphysics and art in fifteenth century Florence, Italy. However, this book is really just about the Medici dynasty, its rise and fall, and only during a year period. The prose is fast-moving and frequently the author uses sentence fragments instead of actual /5(72). At the end of the Middle Ages, art across Europe was dominated by a decorative and refined manner known as the International Style. Ornate, with brilliant color and gilding, it reflected courtly tastes and continued, for some time, to attract patrons in Milan, Ferrara, and other aristocratic Italian cities, even as more naturalistic Renaissance. Michael David Kighley Baxandall, FBA (18 August – 12 August ) was a British art historian and a professor emeritus of Art History at the University of California, taught at the Warburg Institute, University of London, and worked as a curator at the Victoria and Albert book Painting and Experience in Fifteenth-Century Italy was profoundly influential in the. Many topics are discussed in the book, politics, banking, and art. It is to complex to identify a clear story line. But it still worth reading to understand the origins of banking, parliament political form, the sin of Usury from church point of view, the intertwined relationships between money and /5(96).

The Patron and the Artist: Art in the Medici Palace The Medici family commissioned some of the art works for which the 15th century is most famous. From Donatello's David to Botticelli's Primavera, they contributed to a use of art as a means of establishing the family's wealth, prestige, and philosophical values, and in the case of. Given the prominence of Venice as the center of printing and publishing in Italy during the last decades of the fifteenth century, it is not surprising that the artistic design of the Venetian illustrated book was influenced by books from towns such as Naples, Verona, and Brescia. 'Clark shows that diplomatic, economic and dynastic links between fifteenth-century Italian Renaissance elites were sustained by the circulation of art objects: not just traditional paintings and sculptures, but objects of symbolic and material value as heraldic collars, jewels, furniture, and textiles.   The Medici are famous as the rulers of Florence at the high point of the Renaissance. Their power derived from the family bank, and this book tells the fascinating, frequently bloody story of the family and the dramatic development and collapse of their bank (from Cosimo who took it over in to his grandson Lorenzo the Magnificent who presided over its precipitous decline).3/5(4).

Based on the book’s subtitle, one would expect to learn about banking, metaphysics and art in fifteenth century Florence, Italy. However, this book is really just about the Medici dynasty, its rise and fall, and only during a year period/5(). The golden age of Italian woodcut illustration began in the last quarter of the fifteenth century and lasted for roughly years, during which period some of the most harmonious and delightful books ever produced issued from Italian presses. Based on the book’s subtitle, one would expect to learn about banking, metaphysics and art in fifteenth century Florence, Italy. However, this book is really just about the Medici dynasty, its rise and fall, and only during a year by: Sacred and secular texts and images in the Quattrocento refer constantly to the color white, more than any other color. Even in a treatise on charity, which was associated with red in the Renaissance, the theologian Fra Giovanni Dominici mentions white more often. 1 Dominici writes of being washed as white as snow, white roses, ivory, and marble, white and black making gray, white as a Author: Una Roman D’Elia.